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Michael Murray’s on-going commentary on issues in corporate and personal insolvency law and related policy and law reform, in Australia and internationally. Given the scope of insolvency, this extends to business, consumer and professional conduct, and ethics, governance and regulation, criminal, tax, environmental and administrative law, and the courts and government.

 

QUT insolvency expertise

QUT is holding its international personal insolvency conference in Brisbane tomorrow and Friday – 8-9 September 2016 – with speakers presenting from the US, the UK, Europe, China, South Africa, Japan, New Zealand and more.

Leading names in insolvency include Professors Jay Westbrook (US), Iain Ramsay (UK) and Ian Ramsay (Melbourne), along with Professor Rosalind Mason (INSOL Academics) and others from around the world. Disciplines of law, economics and sociology are represented.

The government’s proposed insolvency reforms in personal insolvency will feature at the conference, including by way of comparison with overseas experience. Ireland has in recent times reduced its bankruptcy period from 12 years to three and now to one.  The idea of new Bankruptcy Act for Australia is being raised.  We are pleased to know that the government will have its representatives at the conference.  David Bergman of AFSA is speaking to the reforms..  

In recent times I and other QUT academics have attended or presented at conferences in London (INSOL), Brussels (EU), Sydney (Federal Court-Law Council) and now Brisbane, with INSOL Sydney coming up in 2017.  QUT attended the III conference in Tokyo.

Reform issues I am examining include the law reforms under the new Insolvency Law Reform Act, including disciplinary processes, the proposed law reforms in insolvent trading, debtor in possession models of restructuring, the regulation of practitioners, and their funding and remuneration, the use of technology in insolvency, codes of conduct in restructuring, and the regulation of foreign representatives, including those from Australia, in cross-border insolvency. Comparisons are drawn from the UK, the EU, the US, Japan and Singapore.

Australian law reform can’t be pursued in geographic isolation, nor without exchanges and discussions between the profession and the academics.

Any questions, please contact me.

More coming.

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